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today in what could be the last chance to come talk before the u.s. falls off the fiscal cliff next week. >>> investors are bracing for the final eurozone bond sale of the year. italy will sell up to 6 billion later today. >> and the yen has been sent lower and stocks to their highest level in 21 months. >>> this is the final "worldwide exchange" from london of the year. louisa is here for it. >> i can't believe it. it's my last working day of the year, as well. >> is it? >> yes. >> unfortunately we'll still be talking about the same thing we're talking about now. >> although i feel we'll be talking more debt ceiling, as well. >> and speaking of which, president obama is trying a last ditch effort to restart budget talks days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. speaker john boehner has called the house back into session sunday evening. house majority leader eric cantor is telling his members to be prepared to work through january 2nd. both sides are still far apart on taxes and spending cuts. harry reid says prospect deals by monday are unlikely. minority leader mitch mcconnell s
if the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> and the fed takes the new and surprising step in its ongoing efforts to boost the economy, tying interest rates directly to the u.s. unemployment rate. >>> plus, investors cheering the plan to save danone's plans to offset losses over the next two years. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >>> welcome to the program. coming up on today's show, we'll be plenty busy. we head out to tokyo where carry enjoji has been talking about the upcoming elections. then, we hone in on central london where one pilot project is living roof and major buildings. find out what green living can do go r to improve the area. >>> and today, the 1 billionth international tourist will reportedly arrive at a destination in the world. at 11:20 central time, we'll speak to the world travel council to find out why france is still the world's top destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and central america is now a star performer. first, we want to get the latest news. looking for confidence out
three weeks left before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> italian shares are down nearly 3% this morning. for the most part, it is bank stocks leading the way down. we're now down about 2.76% on the ftse mib. bank stocks have been hit particularly hard this morning. earlier, we saw shares down 5.6%. we're seeing the same thing, whether it's bmps hitting session lows down nearly 6% comes amid concerns about leadership and economic reform in italy following mario monte's announcement that he'll resign once the budget has been passed. this move is likely to bring the country forward to elections next year. the italian prime minister has offered no clue as to whether or not he will run and it comes after sylvia berlusconi declared over the weekend he would throw his hat in the ring for the job of premier. carolyn ross is in italy following the details there. can you walk us through the time frame here? when are we expected monte to step down? what happens next? >> good morning to you, kelly. here is the time frame for you. over the next few weeks, we're expecting the budget sta
and the uk government on following the lead of the scottish government and scottish parliament in its using equal marriage minimum pricing for alcohol and previously on the smoking ban. given the fact that unemployment is now lower in scotland than the rest of the uk, will he follow the lead of the scottish government by introducing a more shovel-ready measures for economic growth? >> i think what the honorable gentleman will find is because of the measures taken in the autumn statement, there's an extra 300 million pounds for the scottish government to spend, so if they want to spend that on shovel-ready measures they can. but i certainly am happy to say that when good policies are introduced in any party, in the united kingdom to i think we all have the opportunity to follow them. >> order. statements, the prime minister. >> here on c-span2 we will leave the british house of commons now as they move onto other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's questions time era questions time error of life wednesdays at 7 a.m. eastern of parliament is in session. you can see thi
to avoid the fiscal cliff as the government starts taking steps to buy more time before the u.s. hits the debt ceiling. the yen hits a two-year low against the dollar as the new japanese government battles to weaken currency. exports are rising, pushing the nikkei to its strongest gain in 20 years. .shares of toyota are heading higher after the u.s. settled a class action lawsuit. the $1 billion payment is already priced in. okay. welcome to "worldwide exchange." plenty of news to watch out of washington. all of this week, we thought it would be a quiet one. but i won't be inside the beltway if they want to get something done. the u.s. will hit the $16.4 trillion debt ceiling come monday. in a letter to congressional leaders, geithner says treasury will begin taking steps to save the government about $2 billion. geithner says it's harder to predict a time frame because the ongone fiscal cliff talks make it difficult to forecast next year's budget. among the measures treasury will take including suspending state and local government securities and investments in the federal employee pe
talks on the u.s. budget crisis. >> the annual chaos computer club conference gets under way in hamburg with organizers warning that government internet surveillance is a growing threat. the international convoy for syria made a proposal in damascus where he is delivering talks. >> he will also be holding discussions in moscow as russia steps up its role in helping to find a political resolution to the conflict. the russian parliament says time is running out for damascus. >> it was a high-level meeting between syrian diplomats and the russian foreign minister. he made moscow's line clear -- the crisis has to be solved through political dialogue between the warring parties, but there was no mention of any new proposals to bring about that objective. the foreign ministry denied reports of a new peace plan from russia and the u.s. >> this plan does not exist. that is why it is not being discussed. with mr. brahimi and our american colleagues, we are trying to find a solution on the basis of the peace plan that was agreed upon in june. >> the geneva agreement calls for a cease-fire and the
would continue to grow, housing would continue to improve, but what's been holding us back is the dysfunction here in washington. and if, you know, people start seeing that on january 1st this problem still hasn't been solved, that we haven't seen the deficit reduction that we could have had had the republicans been willing to take the deal that i gave them, if they say that people's taxes have gone up, which means consumer spending is going to be depressed, then, obviously, that's going to have an adverse reaction in the markets. >> what about automatic spending cuts? those take effect january 1st, as well. do they have to be part of this deal? you've got half of those cuts in defense law? >> well, congress agreed they would cut an additional $1.2 trillion in spending. they put a committee together to try to come up with those numbers. they didn't figure out how to do it. so what we now have is a situation where these automatic spending cuts go into place. now, if we have raised some revenue by the wealthy paying a little bit more, that would be sufficient to turn off what
on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea sheriff lazar -- cea chair lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-term unemployment, and that if we allow regions of our fellow citizens to stay unemployed for year or two years or longer, we know from
>> welcome to the "journal" coming to you from dw in berlin. >> good to have you with us. our top story this hour -- germany investing 10 billion euros to ensure renewable energy is available. >> will the debate be different in america after the new town school massacre. -- newtown school massacre? >> german policymakers say the countries making good progress and plans to phase out nuclear energy and increase its dependence on renewable energy. >> in berlin this morning, they delivered their first assessment of infrastructure changes that will be needed to phase out nuclear power by 2020. >> with federal elections next year, energy is a key policy issue, and the government says 10 billion euros is being invested to keep the country's infrastructure up to date. >> germany's economics minister and environment ministers say they want to work together to complete the country's energy transformation. in the past, they have squabbled about details, but now, they say they are united. >> we are going to reach our goals. environmental protection by phasing of nuclear energy and expanding t
work them up into a frenzy about the threats of theocracy. you use the comparison of iran. good lord. we are so far from any possible menace of religious orthodoxy. try to have a prayer at a high- school football game in texas. there is zero grounds. i do not see it. nor do i think in the members of the religious right, and i know many of them, any desire to tyrannize. they went into politics because they felt they were attacked. they want to be left alone. [applause] >> i appreciate you as a voice of reason. [inaudible] my question is more about historical and interpretation. what do think it keeps us so deeply in our ongoing philosophy of what democracy should be? >> that is a separate question. there are two in my ignorance. the continental french enlightenment and the british enlightenment. they differ radically. the british enlightenment was empirical and temperate. the french enlightenment was severe. one gave rise to be glorious revolution and eventually the american revolution. the french enlightenment gave rise to the french revolution and a blood bath. this sounds like a ph
-- >> in the u.s., president obama makes a last ditch attempt to find a budget compromise. >> in the angry and protests in the streets of regain rate. doctors warn the victim's condition is getting worse. >> and running the sydney yacht race for a sixth time. >> within the next hour, president barack obama is set to meet with top republicans to discuss the nation's looming fiscal clit. white house aides have indicated that obama will discuss measures for avoiding the rest of the automatic spending cuts and tax hikes that will bite if lawmakers fail to come up with a plan. >> pessimism remains the prevailing mood in washington as the january deadline rapidly approaches. neither democrats nor republicans have any new proposals for a workable compromise. >> the starbucks coffee chain has urged its workers in washington, d.c., area to write "come together" on the cups, a plea for party leaders to work out a compromise, but some customers say that is not enough. >> i mean, i like with starbucks is riding on the cups. i wish they would write, like, something else, like "republicans, stop being s
us and we're going to get a deal that has some integrity. and i've said before, if we get anything that makes meaningful step towards fixing our fiscal problem, you're going to see the market go up a couple thousand points. i think that is a, you know, 20% chance in 2013. i think we could really go some place, if politicians show some leadership. >> that's only 20% that they have integrity. >> yeah, yeah. that's up from earlier today. >> thank you, john, thank you guys for being with us today. make sure you join us on monday. "squawk on the street" begins right now. ♪ >>> good friday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street" on this final friday trading session of the year. i'm carl quintanilla at the new york stock exchange, along with melissa lee. >> that's a good song. >> i actually requested that a few moments ago. cramer and faber had the day off. the market has a few jitters as we enter what is going to be an interesting day. of course, the meeting at the white house, 3:00 between the president and some congressional leaders. as for europe, getting some data out of japan o
across the country. so each and every one of us here should look forward to the day with great interest and anticipation. the issues being debated today have been chosen by members of the youth parliament with the help of over a quarter of a million of your peers, and i think i'm right in saying and emphasizing of the five topics being debated, four were chosen by the public vote, and one by nyp themselves namely curriculum for life. today, of course, you debating whether to choosing the issue which you wish to have as your national campaign. this debate is one of the highlights of parliament week, and schools across the country have been taking part in create the debate, a project to encourage them to stage their own debates on the very issues which the u.k. yb are discussing in the combat. we know schools across the country are tuning in to watch and that is hugely welcome. just on process and housekeeping, let me say the following. first, nyp who wish to speak should stand in their place, or raise their hands if seated in a wheelchair. secondly, and most importantly, nyp should alway
2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transforming health care is one of the ways we can solve that issue. i'll demonstrate how new approaches to integrating the delivery system and how it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're
they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
top story this hour. strong criticism from the u.s. and europe over israel's plan to build new settlements. >> the german government comes under fire for the alleged plan to sell tanks to saudi arabia's authoritarian rulers. >> happy birthday, sms. it is the 20th anniversary of the text message. >> israeli ambassadors have been summoned to various european capitals to face criticism over israel's plans to build homes in the west bank. the u.s. also slammed the mood as -- move as "especially damaging." >> israel's prime minister remains especially defiant. they announce the plans to build homes on friday in response to the plan to upgrade palestine to a non-member state. in the israeli ambassador -- >> israeli ambassador daniel taub. paris and berlin called in israeli envoys to express their opposition. they say that israel is sending an negative message in the midst of national -- international peace efforts. >> israel is undermining competency -- confidence. >> israel says it will build 3000 settler homes in eastern jerusalem and the west bank. also plans to accelerate constru
're very excited about it. >> dan, thank you. thanks for the work you're doing. appreciate you joining us today. have great weekend, everybody. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." >> up 146,000, that's the jobs numbers for november. unemployment at 7.7. that's the lowest in exactly four years. good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carlos gutierrez with jim cramer, david faber and melissa lee. questions remain about the internals. europe is reacting to a miss on german industrial production and some reports at least that some ecb members favored a rate cut yesterday. our road map will go like this. that puzzling jobs number beating virtually every wall street estimate as the labor department says sandy had only a minimal effect. is it true a clean number and what are conspiracy theorists saying. >>> a comment hastings made last july. what does it say about s.e.c. rules and whether they are out of date. >> mcdonald's will post same store sales on monday gets an upgrade to buy taking the forecast to a street high after surveying franchisees. we begin with november
>>> the formalitier government is accused of being sent rick. >> massive write-downs n u.s. and brazil while warning over a week's global recovery. >>> and hsbc agreed to settle money laundering charges, paying a record $1.9 billion fine. >>> and we're getting the bumping out here today, not only because it's christmas, but -- >> because james ferguson is here. >> and we are finally in the same place at the same time. ♪ reunited and it feels so good ♪ >> there we go. >> my apologies to everyone for that. >> how about that voice? i feel a christmas sing along coming on at some point. >> it's the holt day spirit. >> it is. >> also, we are outside the u.s. senate. we're going to see just how much progress has been made or how little progress between the president and congress on the fiscal cliff situation. >>> and we'll find out just how much the european debt crisis has affected tourist's willingness to travel to southern europe. >> and then south korea's presidential election, yes, it's not just japan, and what to expect from the winner. >>> let's just plug you into wher
on the reaction to these figures, we have rob doddson with us. rob, welcome. it appears ta stronger services may be weaker on the manufacturing relative to expectations, at least, but the message broadly is still contraction. >> that's the case. we're seeing the pmi indexes track a bit higher over the last few months. so nothing spectacular there. but this does raise hopes that maybe we could see growth coming into the first quarter. the eu, banking -- things like nap but, again, still down. >> not great news for france if we start to look at some of the indexes. there's a lot of focus on this economy. >> exactly. and the weakest spots, given that it's the second largest economy. now, we did see that return to growth for germany, which is a positive and will be a good gain forward. but say order box, very weak. demand, very weak. business confidence very weak and this is going to be hitting activity indicators going forward. >> even though the manufacturing side of it disappointed, the services was stronger. while services is a big part of the economy, it's where we're trying to see the rebalanc
of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, plenty to come on. >> yes. the south american union faces ejection from the imf for allegedly cooking its books about the innation rate. we'll head out to europe where the swiss banking giants could be facing $1.6 billion over libor rate rigging allegations. >> and we'll be on the floor in beijing where china's leaders just wrapped up a major conference. >>> and japan's prime minister election is calling on the bank of japan to heed the call of the masses. abe is beating the heat on the boj just one day after his party's huge win and two days after the bank's next rate setting meeting. kaori enjoji has the latest for us. how much of a game changer is all this? >> this is a serious game changer. it's a comeback for the dlp and shinzo abe. he has made it clear that the economy and economic recovery is going to
pressure, however people use that as a buying opportunity which is evidenced in the two-day chart. with the fiscal cliff fast approaching, naturally it's about time lawmakers took a long recess. >> they're gone today, but will be back tuesday. it meets with small businesses in their district, they will highlight what they say i see ae small business tax hike president obama is pushing. the president is skipping town also for a quick stop in northern virginia. there he will meet with a middle-class family to press congress to protect those making less than $250,000 per year for a tax increase by raising rates on those earning more. the white house demanding a tax rate increase. republicans will agree to increase taxes through eliminating deductions. even if they figure out taxes, democrats and republicans still have to resolve significant differences on entitlements. take a listen. >> it is not even the right thing to do first and foremost. visit the trophy that republicans want? is that what they want to do what is right to raise the rates? speak of the american people want us to
in the u.s. which seems to be stabilizing, looking this also at the housing market. so business sentiment better than expected. it is rising. the current conditions a little weaker than expected. add to that the financial analyst numbers we had as of late, also better than expected. not too bad. >> patricia, we'll see you again next hour. thank you very much for following all the latest there. >> sure. >>> now, shares in ubs have edged up in early trade after the bank announced a major settlement with u.s., u.k., and swiss regulators over its role in the libor fixing scandal. with more we'll look at the story with carolyn roth with us on set. i guess we're expecting a settlement, expecting something big. what have we learned today? >> well, first of all, i mean, the market reaction -- ubs up by 1%, can you believe that? what barclays was hit with $450 million fine, i mean, we saw a big hit in barclays' share price. this fine is three time the amount that barclays was fined. $1.5 billion or $1.4 billion swiss>>frank: francs. this is on the libor manipulation charges. ubs must pay swiss reg
brand joining us on the state of luxury. adam: right now it is time to check stocks. we will add to the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole petallides standing there. we are looking to end the week which way. >> reporter: let's see. right now at 13,161, ever so slightly in positive territory. when you look at the markets, keep an eye on 13,155. that is where we ended last friday. we have been up four straight weeks several. the dow has been trending to the upside. when you talk to traders on wall street a continue to think that the rally is in place. the dow, s&p, and nasdaq gaining 45%. these last four weeks. "we are obviously looking good. you are seeing some of the names on the move here. for example, the fear indexes to the upside. names like alcoa, cisco, caterpillar, hewlett-packard are helping the dow along trying to keep the names that are helping. the weighing on the dow would be some of the stocks such as american express, merck, and exxon mobile. adam: we will check in again with you and roughly 15 minutes. thank you very much. lori: congress of for the weeken
republicans put forward their plan to cut the u.s. deficit, but the proposal is quickly dismissed by democrats and the white house. >>> and australia central bank cuts interest rates to the lowest level since the financial crisis in a bid to get ahead of sluggish commodities demand. we're on tuesday and off to a slightly, what, soft close yesterday for european stocks. right now we're pretty evenlies passed, advancers just about outpacing decliners on the stoxx 600, but not by much, 5:4 if that. so one hour into the trading session, this is where we stand. the ftse 100 just flat, a flat close yesterday. the dax was essentially fairly flat yesterday. up just ten points. the cac 40 yesterday doing a little bit better, up 0.2%. first pointing out ftse up 9 out of the last 11. we have seen yields continue to decline in spain. just 5.23%, but still capped. spain requesting financial assistance. we'll keep our eye on the uk as we head toward the bank of england meeting this week p. dollar index has hit a one month low. you're redollar up to euro-dollar up near the high we saw yesterday. dollar-yen m
-bowles. erskin bowles will join us this morning, as well. if you have the democrats quoting him, the republicans quoting him, we'll very where he comes down and where things stand right now. >> you do simpson-bowles now instead of the bowls-simpson? >> i looked it up on going.. the more often cited is simple is son-bowles. >> the journal has an interesting piece. they don't like corker for breaking rank. they say why are republicans negotiating this themselves? they say let boehner do the negotiations. anyway, you would be hard pressed to find something who sdn have aen opinion on the fiscal cliff. this weekend, the ahead of the imf said the united states is more vulnerable to its domestic trouble more than anything else happening in the eurozone. christine lagarde says a balanced approach is needed and she says don't kick the can down the road, which is rich coming from a european. >>> european trading the lower this morning. italy's prime minister mario monti, yes, the same one that is famous from all the anti-trust things back in the -- was that the '90s? >> the '90s, yeah. >> monti announcin
and for companies. there's a lot of money on the table to be used to create the kind of dynamic social safety net. the problem is we've sort of let it stay off the table in term of revenue and we can afford to provide the sort of optimal sort of career labor exchange through the government. >> that's right. and to your point, you've used the word flexible. let's take a look at who this flexibility works for. it works well for the employers, for the companies. but the rise of contingent labor, the rise of long-term unemployment and collapse of the local labor market have created incredible problems for workers. that flexibility has not worked for workers. >> there are problems that workers are experiencing that probably due to globalization and other things, it's causing a bad scene for workers in general. but these developments aren't necessarily making it worse. they are just going along with the badness there. like, for example -- >> i don't know about that. there are 64,000 workers in georgia who are going into christmas just having been kicked out of earned unemployment benefits. why? because
the problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour and 45 minutes. next on book tv. [applause] >> thanks to the fashion institute of technology. unquestionably the most in the world today. [applause] in addition to being nobel laureates i would have to say from the vantage point for the economic thinking those would be my finalists. [applause] as you know, we've written a book that pertains to the challenges and circumstance the price of an equality. on behalf of them i thank you for your patronage and. let's start with paul. paul, you talked about and this depression now. a lot of people don't believe we could end this now. but agency deutsch human beings have to take on this challenge? something that is recognizably the same kind of animal. we victimize it is the same technology still there and skills are still there. look back to the 1930's and there are a lot of people making the argument that there were no easy answers and you could quickly get out of this [inaudible] and the 1939 and these are fundamental problems and if we want to make progress to cut unemployment benefits and thi
. people's lives and jobs and retirement funds. >> thank you for being with us this morning. dave, you are headed to washington. let us know what's happening. >> he's going to fix it. >> we're going to have pizza. >> make sure you join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" is next. ♪ >>> led zeppelin to wash away monday blues. congrats to the band for winning kennedy center honors last night. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla along with jim cramer, david faber live at nyse. melissa will join us in the next hour. we're kicking off the month of december with strength. anticipating good auto numbers today. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing da
statement to parliament today. will be out in westminster soon. steve is out to give us more detailed analysis of what to expect. let's just go back to the eurozone. as you say, thin advances here. are we capping -- it's up against the yen as well. there's obviously been a big yen story. >> yeah, i think the euro/yen has had perhaps more to do with eu euro/dollar than anything else. the euro crosses in general have been story rather than euro/dollar and euro/yen at the forefront. i think the euro/yen forecast is overplayed in what japan will ultimately deliver on. but mum is pretty good. i think you still play for a little yen weakness. i think we'll see a lot of people trying to buy yen back because i don't think we'll get delivery in all these preelection promises. >> do we all think we know what the chancellor is going to say? >> judging by the many pages being given to it in the newspapers, you feel like what else can he say? it's not going to be a day where you'll buy sterling aggressively because most of the news is going to be bad. we're going to have lower growth. potentially
. >> about 10.5. >> join us tomorrow. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." >>> good wednesday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." live at the nyse. what a morning shaping up here. a little data to look at. m&a. the president speaks to the business roundtable in a couple of hours. futures with modest gains. europe holding onto gains and china up nearly 3% over night as shanghai catches a break. our road map begins with a $20 billion deal. freeport mcmoran getting into the energy business making two acquisitions. plains exploration and mcmoran exploration. >>> concerns over the u.s. economy as adp misses estimates. the blame goes to superstorm sandy. goldman says the party is officially over for gold. >> starbucks at an investors conference will add 1,500 stores in the u.s. over the next five years. wait until you hear what they said about china. >> a big day in media. pandora ceo joins us live later this morning as the stock fell nearly 20% on weak guidance and netflix signs a big exclusive with disney. how much are they having to pay up for that? >>> let's deal with th
to facebook, like us and ask your question. >> talk of the day, sirius, the company announcing a $2 billion share buy back. and it's a $2 stock, but everybody knows it. mel's gone, howard's still there. >> all right, that does it for us today, again join me on facebook after the show for office hours. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." >>> good thursday morning, welcome to "squawk on the street," i'm melissa lee live from the new york stock exchange. negative across the board, looks like we're going to lose about 8.5% on the dow. we're watching for headlines out of an ecd press report. our road map this morning starting with apple, cratering on its biggest decline yesterday on four years, closing just pennies off the lows of the session. the stock continues lower premarket as investors watch the death cross watch. >> a cnbc exclusive, tim geithner says over the cliff is a must. >> bank of england and ecb keeps rates unchanged. europe continues to hang in there economically. >> and nat gas gets a boost. the government finds exporting it is better than keeping it here at home. >>
of us who had the privilege to serve with you. i hope and i pray that god will give you and your wife many, many more years of life and enjoyment because you have certainly earned it, because you have served not only the united states house of representatives, but you have served us, you have served the people of our districts as well as helping us be better members of congress. so with that i will close by asking god to please bless you and your family and may god continue to bless the house of representatives and jay pearson, you will be in our hearts until the day we die. god bless you. . mr. woodall: at this time, it's migrate pleasure to yield the gentleman from california, chairman of the ways and means health subcommittee, mr. herger. mr. herger: i thank my good friend. how wonderful it is to be able to sit here and listen to all these incredibly warm remarks from people who, like myself, know and love jay pearson. and there's a reason for that. jay, you're one of the best of the best. and i think, it's hard to believe that 26 years comes and goes so very, very quickly, but it
massachusetts. mr. markey: and if barney frank was down here, none of us would have -- none of this would have happened in terms of the understanding of the parliamentary procedure. he was up there trying to grab an managenary microphone. . john oliver has been for us -- olver, has been for us an invaluable colleague. he taught so much to us. when he sat down with us talking about transportation, he explained our own districts to us as far as what was possible. on climate change, i talked to him for about 20 years. he was on this issue in the early 1990's and probably understood it probably even before that. he is that smart. he is that visionary in terms of the issues are essential not just to massachusetts, but to our planet. and it has been migrate honor to have served with you, john and to have called you my friend and colleague overall of these years and we thank you so much for what you have done for us and for the country and thank you. and with that -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. under the speaker's announced policy of january 5, 2011, the gentleman from
military. and so when i see raises for the troops it pleases i think all of us. i'm concerned about the afghanistan timeline. i had hoped that it could be expedited. i certainly do commend the iron dome because we saw it work with respect to israel. i question however the drones that may have collateral damage. but i do think it's important that this bill does in fact make a commitment to protecting the women and children of afghanistan, responds to the issues dealing with sexual assault against military personnel and particularly women and it's strong on iran sanctions. . i rise today as well because when we talk about people we talk about men and women in the united states military, we talk about their health. yesterday in the rules committee i raised this point and i raise it again, i'm going to support this bill because i think it will make a leap of faith commitment to finding the cause of triple negative breast cancer. they are usually of a higher grade and size, onset at a younger age, more aggressive, and more likely to metastasize. the survival rate for breast cancer may ha
, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of dance. as a rock, he was part of several groups, one of which opened for steppenwolf, among other performers for those old enough
for us? >> well, on the fiscal cliff, i wish it were different, but it certainly is beginning to shape up like, in the end, the democrats will be able to step back and say we raised taxes on rich people and the republicans will take credit for cutting programs. and it looks like it will go into january, unfortunately. the market doesn't seem to care. >> all the big deal, boehner and obama tried to do last year, still have to do that, simpson boles-type thing. >> by what the secretary of the treasury said yesterday. >> right. >> thank you for being here. >> bromance. a lot of fun. make sure you join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good thursday morning, welcome to "squawk on the street" live from the new york stock exchange, i'm carl kin ten nia with melissa lee, cramer and neighborer are off today but we are joined by dennis. good morning to you dennis, thanks for coming in. futures today, a lot to deal with as you probably know. the fiscal cliff headline watch continues. you just heard john kanas say the market not too concerned. futures up 21 points. decent dat
.3 earthquake strikes japan's northeast coast. tsunami warnings have been issued. job growth in the u.s. are expected to have slowed significantly in november as hurricane sandy battered the economy. and euro hits a session low, 0.4% as problems in europe's periphery continue to weigh. a powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake has struck across japan's northeastern coast. the quake rocked buildings as far as tokyo according to reports. u.s. geological survey said there was no threat in the wider pacific ocean. the yen has been rising to a session high before we got details of that. and right now, you can see dollar-yen at 82.39. 82.17 before that happened. some safe haven in-flows into japanese currency. if there was going to be a wave in terms of tsunami that was going to hit, it would have happened around five, six minutes ago and she had yet to see any specific drop or change in the sea level. so we'll hope that that continues on that particular way. atomic power says no irregularities seen at its nuclear plant. operations are normal after the quake. so we'll keep our eyes on that. and we'
negotiations. this is about a half an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> morning. thank you all for joining us this morning. i'm maya macguineas, i am working with the campaign to fix the debt, and i'm the president for the committee for a responsible federal budget, and i'm really excited to join a phenomenal panel that we have with us today to help the campaign fix the debt which is, um, a large, nonpartisan coalition that is focused on helping members of congress come together to put in place a comprehensive debt deal. so i'm very delighted that today what we have is a diverse and very experienced, um, group of panelists to talk about two major topics; tax reform and health care reform. all in the context of how are we going to work together to put in place a plan that would be able to tackle the nation's fiscal challenges. we will hear numerous different opinions, we will hear plenty of disagreement, and i hope we'll hear a lot of ideas about how to generate different, um, useful reforms to the budget that can help get a big deal put in place. and none of us should forget that what's going
now. okay. everybody's there. mandy? >> okay. joining us now we have a cast of thousands. dan mcmahon from raymond james. nathan backrat. and our very own rick santelli. thank you for joining us today. nathan, let's start with you. so 13 and a half trading days left. what do you do with those to make it worth it? >> y better have the right allocation to begin with. in the meantime guess what's gotten cheaper? europe. >> germany and france at two-week highs last week. >> there's a few countries over there. i like the relative value there. they've got a printing press. they're going to open that. what i learned is you don't fight the tape and don't fight a bailout. i've got about 30% off this country -- outside of this country. and added 10% in emerging markets. now i think that we've had a bloodless revolution again in china, i think it's a great place. look at emerging markets. better value while you wait around. >> and they've done well over the last year. it was just they've been the silent gain. you haven't quite realized they've been doing so well. >> i like it. i wouldn't ru
eastern europe? anything? >> one of the things that happened since 1989 is the region we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have anything in common with one another, except a common memory of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is from some land. europe is now divided in many ways to -. there are a few elements of the communist past you can see. there is a paranoid element in politics that comes from the legacy of people being spied on and having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals behind their backs, because secret deals were done behind their backs, and that is understandable. there is an anxiety about being left behind in the west. the memory of the past continues to play out, but in truth, these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. >> you through -- you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? >> it depends on how you count. >> what were the three democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different histori
. there was an iron curtain theaters used to use to prevent fires. churchill used it first in private. >> you know why? >> it was a favor for truman. that is where truman was from. >> let's get a slice of that speech. >> an iron curtain has descended across the continent. behind that line, like all the capitals of the ancient states of central and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the question why no people went along with it. what is the mentality? what are institutional pressures? why do camp guard do what they are told to do? i decided to write about this period right after world war ii, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory
workers areot using up all of the vacation time they are said to be seen as lazy and losing their job. is is a good sign for the economy. how so, steve. not for those two reasons . we don't have too much vacation or little. we do it just right. europe had work like we did. you want lopping beer vacation you can have a stagnant economy like europe. we raise taxes we'll have longer vacation but fewer jobbings. >> you are right. we don't want to be like the french. and ople here i the united states and government union. and i was on vacatn and check my blackberry and read a ri unger e-mail while on vacation. >> you are never onacation. >> you work it anyway. nine out of the 10 are checking their work phones. any time to rejuvenate and come back ragged. >> we need that vacation time to work better. >> when you say ecomy you are talking about gdp. good or ill it is major transaction. have everyone never talk a day off and work 60 hours a week. steve is protesting that. >> there is it a correlation between vacation time and increased productivity. a 2010 study show that americans felt refre
. steve is going to be talking about their expansion right here in the u.s. including a three-star, upscale hotel. they had been focusing on the lower scale hotels. will that hurt their brand, or might it increase it? we'll be asking him. liz: first, what drove the markets in today's data download. stocks closing higher after struggling for direction early on with the dow crossing the flat line 25 times. all three major indices did post gains. technology had to be, right? was one of the best performers along with consumer discretionary. today's top performing sectors, health care and utilities, well, they did lag. the number of americans filing new applications for unemployment benefits falling for a third straight week as we remind you, thises the number you want to see fall. hurricane sandy's impact continues to slowly but surely subside. we had weekly jobless claims dropping by 25,000 last week to a seasonally-adjusted 370,000. the week's prior total was revised upward to 395,000 from 393,000. and treasury prices rising today, pushing yields back down to their lowest level
, good news, but a u.s. federal agency's going to signing off blackberry. david: oh, competition. whoever thought blackberry would come back, but it has. liz: at least for the moment, dow not coming back, 72.s down on the day, starting in the green by a tiny bit, but the markets started to the upside, crossed the line 30 times, and at 11:30 a.m. eastern, boehner came out, said spending's the issue. the president's not listening. it basically ruined the marks as you see. s&p couldn't gain here, down eight points. david: looking at the negative numbers, imagine what they would be if the fed did not do the money printing. a lot worse than it was today. could have been worse. facebook, when the market is in the red, facebook in the green, today is not an exception. today, a big bump, over 2% bump. tomorrow, of course, is the third lock up, another 156 million shares of facebook coming online, previous times when that's happened, we saw the stock jump as it did today. liz: right. everybody expected it to fall, it didn't. we're watching that. when apple falls on iphone estimate cuts, so do the
and be willing to negotiate on spending. >> i see the future. the president lets us go over and then proposes a tax cut for the lower 98%. >> could you vote against it? >> he could do that for the two -- the two top rates is $400 billion. but he's got to do something on spending to address the problem. >> thank you, senator, for your time. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." >>> good monday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." we're here at the new york stock exchange. let's get a check on how we're setting up for the first trading session of the week. we certainly have a lot to chew on over the weekend with the sunday talk shows, focusing on the fiscal cliff. it looks like we're looking at a lower open for the dow. as for the action in europe, really, the action focuses on italy where there's an impending political regime change. more on that in just a moment. the road map starts at the golden arches. mcdonald's blowing out expectations for november sales after the dismal drop in the month of october. hoping to fuel the rise, the bacon/onion/cheddar sandwich. >> there's on
of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: the yeas are 229. the nays are 182. 2/3 not being in the affirmative, the rules are not suspended and the bill is not passed. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leaves of absence for mr. griffin of arkansas for the week of december 11 and mr. reyes of texas for today and for the balance of the week. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the requests are granted. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the speaker pro tempore: members and staff, please remove your conversations from the floor. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts rise? >> address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, earlier this year -- mr. frank: i was c
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